Breathalyzers for Marijuana, possible in the future?

[Tweet “A new device called the Cannabix can determine if a person is truly intoxicated from marijuana use.”]

When it comes to DUI and drug charges, users of marijuana will have a difficult time in the near future.

Is there hope yet in the legal world for them, even if the current laws are against them? Smoking or consuming any amount of prohibitive drug is already illegal because of possession, but they may also be charged with DUI if they’re “high” while driving.

Las Vegas DUI lawyer and experts have challenged that current testing methods using blood, saliva, and hair are extremely inaccurate when it comes to determining if a person was indeed high while they were driving.

This has led various states like Colorado to pass strict laws and legal limits regarding the consumption of marijuana. Most states have a defined limit of 5 nanograms of THC (a compound in cannabis) per milliliter of blood, which is enough to convict someone of a DUI; it’s actually even stricter for states that have legalized medical marijuana, with a legal limit of 2 nanograms. While everyone knows that the states are doing their best for the safety of drivers everywhere, it’s still no excuse for the many arrests that occurred, even though it should not have happened in the first place.

Are Breathalyzers for Marijuana the change we needed?

Thankfully, there are some good news for everyone, particularly for marijuana consumers. A new device called the Cannabix may be the solution for the current dilemma. A Canadian police officer is currently developing the device, who claims that it can detect if a person has smoked marijuana within the past two hours; hopefully, the device will live up to its expectations and accurately determine if a person is truly intoxicated from marijuana use, even with the small detection window. Not only will this protect the pot-loving community from DUI charges, but it may also quicken the decriminalization or legalization of marijuana across all states.

 

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