Prosecution in Las Vegas, Nevada Defined

There are two parties involve in a criminal case: the defense, which includes the accused with his/her criminal defense lawyer and the prosecution, with the victim and the prosecuting team. Criminal prosecution only happens when someone violates the criminal code or common law. These laws, by definition, are laws that were passed by the legislating-body of the government and anyone who tries to breach them is automatically subject to disciplinary sanctions.

Every criminal case starts with the arrest; a police officer can only arrest a person if they find the accused suspicious or if, on some cases, the enforcing officer can present a more probable cause. Police enforcers cannot detain the accused longer than possible (for fingerprinting and other legal procedures) unless a DA will take the case that will prevent the immediate release of the accused.

This is entirely different from prosecution when prosecutors file formal charges in an attempt to prove that the accused has committed a violation. Most prosecutors ensure that justice will be served and head directly to conviction. With supporting files from police reports and the defendant’s previous criminal records, it is their job to ensure that the case will stand in court. He/She is also responsible to be involved in the investigation to collect possible information needed.

Once the case was handed over to the prosecutor, the prosecutor usually represents the government and the law that the defendant broke rather than to amend the wishes or bargains of the victim. Aside from this, it is also the prosecutor’s job to protect the innocent and make sure they won’t get convicted to the crimes they didn’t commit.

Since most prosecutors are government hired or appointed and their name varies depending on what level of judiciary they represent. They can be called dispute advocate, counsel or government, state, county or district attorney.

For more information about Prosecution, you may ask Attorney Ross Goodman.